Defining Moments of Our Lives: People Share the First News Stories They Remember

Every few years, a massive event rocks a generation. These news stories become parts of our core memories, helping form unbreakable generational values. 

Here, people from every generation share the very first news stories they remember. These events had the most significant impact on developing minds through the years. 

Bay of Pigs – 1961

Bay of pigs, Cuba, present day.
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The Bay of Pigs incident saw the US plan an invasion of Cuba in a failed attempt to overthrow communism. The botched mission solidified Casto’s stronghold on Cuba and embarrassed America. 

Kennedy’s Assassination – 1963

Life Magazine covers from 1963 showcasing Kennedy and his family.
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The defining moment of most Baby Boomer’s childhood was the 1963 assassination of President Kennedy in Dallas. 

Introducing the Beatles – 1964

LIVERPOOL UNITED KINGDOM 06 07 2023: Picture of the Beatles at The Beatles Story is a museum in Liverpool about the Beatles and their history. It is located on the historical Royal Albert Dock
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The world in turmoil needed something, and the Beatles brought that something to America with their first appearance on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964. The British Invasion shaped culture for decades. 

The Moon Landing – 1969

View of the Earth from the surface of the Moon.
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Although most generation-defining news events showcase tragedy, the 1969 televised moon landing did the opposite. It gave Americans a sliver of hope in this uncertain world and showcased humanity’s tenacity and ability to overcome insurmountable odds. 

Kent State – 1970

A plaque outside Kent State as a memorial to the events of 1970.
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The exhilaration of the moon landing was soon replaced with sorrow when members of the National Guard opened fire on US civilians protesting the Vietnam War. 

The Queen’s Silver Jubilee – 1977

Queen Elizabeth in 2007.
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UK Gen Xers had fond memories of 1977 when the country celebrated Queen Elizabeth’s Silver Jubilee. 

Elvis Presley’s Death – 1977

A portrait of Elvis on an album - piece of Elvis memorbilia.
Photo Credit: Dan Kosmayer via Shutterstock.com.

Things weren’t as jovial in the United States. Millions mourned upon reading 1977’s headline “The King is Dead.”

Mt. St. Helen’s Eruption – 1980

Mt. St. Helen's at sunrise, with a field of wildflowers in the foreground.
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The 1980s ushered in a fury of volcanic ash with the eruption of Mt. St. Helen’s Volcano. The eruption was a horrifying reminder of Mother Nature’s power. 

John Lennon’s Assassination- 1980

The Imagine tribute in New York's Central Flower decorated with orange, red, and yellow flowers arranged in a peace sign.
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The world stood in shock once again when one of the biggest rock icons (and peace advocates) was assassinated in New York City. Kids only remember their parent’s immense sorrow; it felt as if a fog covered the entire world. 

The Space Shuttle Disaster – 1985

A rocket ship blasts off with a pillar of fire.
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In 1985, classrooms nationwide tuned in to watch the Space Shuttle Challenger ascend to the stars. The Challenger was the first spacecraft to feature a teacher as a crew member, as NASA hoped to inspire generations of children to dedicate their lives to science. 

The kids watched in horror as the ship exploded during the launch sequence. 

The Fall of the Berlin Wall – 1989

A still-standing segment of the Berlin Wall in Germany.
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1989 brought better news. The collapse of the Soviet Union led to the fall of the Berlin Wall, a symbol of oppression throughout the Western world. 

1980s – Aids Epidemic

A monument to the iconic signer Freddy Mercury. A bronze statue of the singer in Switzerland.
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Many people who were kids in the 1980s remember news stories of the frightening new disease, often associated with gay men. The aids epidemic filled the airways for a decade. It was still making headlines in 1991. In that year, basketball star Magic Johnson announced his diagnosis and Queen frontman Freddy Mercury lost his battle with the illness. 

Rodney King – 1992

A line of LA Police officers in riot gear during the LA riots of the early 1990s.
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The celebration was short-lived. In 1992, Los Angeles erupted in riots after police officers were caught on camera abusing Rodney King. 

The OJ Simpson Trial  – 1995

Oj Simpson in 1993 with then-girlfriend Paula Barbieri.
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Millions of nineties kids remember the hours-long police chase in the white Ford Bronco carrying suspected murderer OJ Simpson and the subsequent televised trials. 

OKC Bombing – 1995

2017 - a memorial to the victims of the OKC bombing.
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Another major event rocked the US in 1995. Timothy McVeigh parked a bomb underneath the daycare at the federal building in OKC. The horrific act traumatized the nation. 

Princess Diana’s Funeral – 1997

Princess Diana in the back seat of a car, Washington DC, 1996.
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The world mourned the loss of a beloved princess in 1997 after a horrific car accident ended her life. 

Bill Clinton’s Impeachment – 1999

Former president Bill Clinton addressing a crowd with VP Al Gore behind him in 1993.
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President Clinton’s impeachment trial mesmerized the nation. For the first time, a president was held accountable for inappropriate sexual behavior in the White House. We will never forget his iconic remarks, “I did not have sexual relations with that woman.”

Columbine – 1999

Child walking towards the stairs leading up to a school with a backback on.
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The Columbine shooting changed the world. The nonsensical and seemingly random violence shook our sense of security, showing us that no one is safe from maniacs on a mission. It also led to a host of copycats that continue wreaking havoc on our youth today. 

Y2K – 1999

Vintage computer on a colorful bright pink desk against a bright orange wall.
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The world panicked in 1999 as programmers in the new computer age realized they didn’t think about the changing millennium. What could go wrong when the clock struck midnight was plastered all over the news for weeks. 

9/11 – 2001

View of New York Skyline after 9/11 with two blue lights shining brightly where the twin towers once stood.
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Everyone remembers where they were the day planes crashed into the Twin Towers. It was the first event many Gen Zers remember from their childhood. Even the youngest among us watching the news knew the world would never be the same. 

Obama’s Election – 2008

Former president Barack Obama on stage during his 2008 presidential campaign.
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The youngest internet users replaced the fear and anxiety of terror with hope of a new day. Obama’s historic election gave millions of people hope for a brighter tomorrow. Unfortunately, the hope didn’t last that long. 

Remembering The Coolest Things from the 90s

trendy gen Z teenager on a pink background
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Nineties kids will remember these fun trends from the last great decade. 

The best things about the 1990s.

What’s Hot Now: Gen Z Trends We Don’t Get

Trendy hipster teenage girl wearing sunglasses in pink light.
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Gen Z is into some weird stuff. Here are some Gen Z trends we hope they outgrow

Scientists Who Changed the World

A black and white photo of Albert Einstein, one of the most famous scientists in history, in front of a chalk board.
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Science changed the world. These famous scientists helped make our future what it is today

Are We Living in a Simulation?

Digital art that looks like it's from a scene in a video game.
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The evidence is all around us. Here are the biggest clues that we might be living in a simulation

Skills of the Future You Need To Learn Today

smiling Female executive with arms crossed standing in front of a group pf blurred out workers.
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The future is constantly evolving before our eyes. Entire industries are at risk of automation, but these skills will help you remain competitive in a massively changing world
 

Source: Reddit